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10 Reasons Why You Should Move To Texas

Chevron Tower, Houston, TX by Dave Wilson

Chevron Tower, Houston by Dave Wilson

You may all go to hell, and I will go to Texas. ~ Davy Crockett

Many people are moving to Texas. My entire immediate family left California and moved to Texas over the past decade. One of my relatives ran a commercial refrigeration firm in Northern California for years. He got so sick of the regulations that he decided to move his business to Texas. Now, he runs the same company here.

Every day I see more new license plates from out of state. California, New York, Michigan, New Jersey, Florida, and many others. For a middle-class person, Texas is hard to beat. Are you a productive citizen who is sick of your state? Here are the top ten reasons why you should move down to Texas:

1) Low Taker Vs. Maker Ratio

I recently found an interesting post that explores the state “taker versus maker” ratio. This ratio compares private employees (makers) with public sector employee and welfare recipient (takers) for all fifty states. Texas has a low ratio, meaning public sector salaries and welfare costs are under control.

2) Low Taxes

Texas has no personal or corporate income tax. Property taxes can be higher, but in general, property prices are lower. Of course, you could avoid property taxes altogether by renting. Texas does have a state sales tax, which can be as high as 8.25% depending on the county and city. Some people avoid sales tax by buying big-ticket items online, although Texas is trying to put a stop to that practice.

3) Low Cost Of Living

You hear many people complain that Texas has low-wage jobs. Well, it is true that wages can be lower in Texas. However, the cost of living is lower as well. It evens out. You do not need to spend much to have a good quality of life in here. Food, rent, and health care costs are lower. Gas and utilities are cheaper. Lighter business regulation means it costs less money to start up and run a business. Can you run your business remotely? Take advantage of geo-arbitrage by living in a cheaper state while earning money from more expensive ones.

4) Cheaper Real Estate

Texas is massive. It has always been land-rich (and historically, cash-poor). There is just more land land here, so Texas real estate is cheaper when compared to other many other coastal states. Out-of-state residents can do well selling higher priced property and then using the proceeds to buy cheaper Texas houses and land. Of course, there are expensive areas, but most middle-class people will be able to find an affordable piece of Texas to call home.

5) Low Unemployment

Texas has low unemployment rates. It helps that so many companies come here, bringing new jobs with them. Some argue that jobs in Texas are low paying, and do not offer health insurance. Consider the fact that Texas has a very young population. Included in the employment figures are data for high school kids and underage workers. These jobs typically pay less, and do not offer insurance. That skews the data.

6) Weak Unions

Texas does have unions. The state is not immune to union action as we saw with the recent union showdown at Hostess in Dallas. Historically though, Texas has been unfriendly to unions. Texas is a right to work state. Want to join a union? No one will stop you. But unlike in some other, less enlightened states, no one can force you join a union here. Texas is a good place to work if you value your personal freedom and don’t like being forced to join obsolete organizations.

7) Good Schools

Despite what you may have heard, Texas has a strong education system. Texas takes care of minority and economically disadvantaged students as graduation rates show. Some people like to portray Texans as just a bunch of dumb hillbillies, but these numbers are hard to deny. Texas is also home to many world-class colleges including the University of Texas, Texas A&M, Baylor, and Rice University. Texas also allows parents the freedom to home-school their children.

8) Friendly People

I’ve lived in California, New Jersey, and Texas. And I’ve traveled to numerous foreign countries. I can tell you that most Texans are very friendly and down-to-earth. Race relations in Texas are good and most Texans are very tolerant of others. The larger cities in here are incredibly diverse.

9) Respect For The 2nd Amendment

In Texas, you have the right to defend yourself. You can own and carry a gun. You do not need a permit or license to buy a firearm in Texas. You do need a permit to carry a concealed handgun. Texas is a Shall Issue state, which means it is relatively easy for law-abiding citizens to get a concealed handgun license.

10) Very Little Snow

I love snow. But after spending three winters living on the East Coast, I’d had enough. It barely snows in Texas. When it does snow, it is light when compared to the East Coast or Northern states. If you have ever spent time living up North, I do not have to explain why this is attractive.

If you are a person who values your freedom then Texas is a great place to be. It has some downsides, mainly the weather. And fire ants. But overall, the pros out weigh the cons. Are you sick of your state and its ridiculous rules and taxes? Sell your house, quit your job, and pack your car. Come start over in Texas!

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  • jasmine

    This gave me good reasons. But, I hate TX history. I got a 66.

    • http://movingtotexas.net/ Moving To Texas

      History is over-rated, move to Texas anyway. ;)

  • CapnFoo

    Thinking about moving from NJ down to Texas. Thanks for making my decision a little more decisive.

    • http://movingtotexas.net/ Moving To Texas

      No problem. I love New Jersey. But, I think you’ll like it here too.

    • Paul Scott

      Coming from NJ, Texas will be like heaven to you.

  • Sybil Ludington

    Love Texas and Texans (well except for that Wendy Davis and Sheila Jacka $ $ Lee) and will be down as soon as we can. Husband is a native born Texan so I’m a Texan in law… If Texas secedes, we’ll be down sooner to help defend her.

    • http://movingtotexas.net/ Moving To Texas

      Nice. Let us know how you like it, once you’re here.

  • Mike

    Been thinking of moving out of Arizona and couldn’t decide where to go. After reading about Austin, I have decided that is where I want to be. Next year I will be making the move and hopefully be able to find a job soon after

    • http://movingtotexas.net/ Moving To Texas

      Yes, I’m here in Austin. Love it here, it’s a great place to live. Dallas and Houston are good choices too. Take a look at our jobs search page if you’re on the hunt for a new career in the Lone Star State:

      http://movingtotexas.net/jobs-in-texas/

  • fadwa

    Thank you im also thinking of moving next year, its much too expensive here in VA

    • http://movingtotexas.net/ Moving To Texas

      No worries. Yes, you should come on down here to Texas.

  • Diana

    Texas…The next California once the liberals take over….

  • Diana

    I love Texas and always have…I want it to stay the way it is but I fear that a lot of people want to move there because they already voted in liberals in their own states and now they want to leave what they themselves created….Very sad because they won’t change…They will just try to change Texas…

    • http://movingtotexas.net/ Moving To Texas

      Yeah, I hear you. But hopefully, enough like-minded people will continue moving here so that doesn’t happen. Maybe that will keep it more red, or at least purple.

      • Diana

        I would be there today if I could….But it’s going to be a couple of years…

  • Bill

    I am a recent transplant (18 months) from Chicago land and
    after doing an incredible amount of research my wife and I decided on moving
    our family (have three daughters) to San Antonio. I found a job (work in accounting)
    and my wife was able to transfer with her company. This was the best decision
    we have ever made. Chicago weather is depressing, the economy is crumbling, the
    cost of living and taxes are suppressing, and the political environment is
    criminal (literally). We just couldn’t take it anymore. I had a 3 hour round
    trip commute to work and after eleven years it was time for a change.

    Texas has been a 360 turn around, everything is more
    affordable (yes, even property taxes) and my commute is now only 25 minutes
    each way. People are nicer, life is way easier, and we are even relatively close
    to both the beach and the mountains. Plus, we trend more towards the right politically
    so it has been refreshing to find people that share our views. The education
    system is good too and we are coming from top rated schools in the suburbs of
    Chicago.

    If you are from the Midwest or anywhere else for that matter
    I would suggest a move. Plain and simple.

    • http://movingtotexas.net/ Moving To Texas

      Hey Bill. Thanks for the comment.

      That’s sad; Chicago is truly one of America’s great cities.

      But I’m glad you and your family have done well here…and I agree on the moving recommendation!

    • Collective

      You mean 180…

  • http://movingtotexas.net/ Moving To Texas

    Sadly, I’ve seen the same thing.

  • Ryan

    I have now lived in Texas for majority of my life. Although I never found a passion for the culture here (prefer northern culture), but all the other pros outweigh the small amount of culture I eneviably encounter. TX has so many different areas, I can visit a different city every weekend and feel like I traveled out of state. Not to mention the major airport hub in my backyard incase I do feel like getting away for the weekend. mild winters, low cost of living, and highly paid executives make Texas a great place to make your new home. Buy a $50k truck of your choice and say “ya’ll”(two things I won’t do), then people might think you were born here.

    • http://movingtotexas.net/ Moving To Texas

      Hey Ryan. Thanks for the comment. Yeah, it’s not a perfect. But I agree that the pros outweigh the cons.

  • thetruthseeker

    Hello All,

    I have been doing a lot of research on moving down to Texas, currently n Indiana and originally from N.J.
    I heard many great things about Austin, but have been unable to secure a job. Where should I start next Dallas or Houston. So far what I like about Indiana is lower cost of living vs. NJ, clean, quiet, no traffic, no tolls.

    Thank you all in advance for your efforts.

    • http://movingtotexas.net/ Moving To Texas

      Hi there. Thanks for visiting my site.

      I’ve never been to Indiana, so I can’t compare it to Texas. I personally prefer Dallas over Houston, but both have lots to offer. Houston is a bigger city, has more of a Southern vibe. Dallas is like a cross between the Midwest and Los Angeles.

      You should check out our sister site to find jobs:

      http://workingintexas.net

      • thetruthseeker

        will do, ty

  • Louie

    Definitely moving to Texas within a year. Just finished a two week tour of the Eastern half of the Greatest State I have seen (37 so far). Haven’t settled on the area yet. Just North of Houston or the Longview area are very high on the list.. Any recommendations or comments are welcome.

    • http://movingtotexas.net/ Moving To Texas

      Hi Louie

      Thanks for the comment. Obviously, Longview is a small town, while Houston is one of the largest cities in the country. So really, just depends on what you prefer.

      Hopefully, some other readers who’ve lived in those TX cities can discuss the pros and cons…

  • James Tuyen

    I’m from Chicago and went to Houston last yr for vacation. I love the state. People are so friendly. Taxes are low and weather is amazing. I have been thinking about moving my family to Texas. I’m just so sick and tired of the corruption in IL.

    • http://movingtotexas.net/ Moving To Texas

      Hi James. Come on down, we’d love to have you!

  • Linda

    I am from California and we moved here eight years ago,. I must say there are lots of things about Texas that are good. People are nice, housing is cheap, HEB is the best grocery store ever, lots of restaurants and activities. For me, the weather is difficult most of time, I get sick in the heat and I do not like the cold, which leaves a few weeks a year for me. I miss walking every day. The property tax here is crazy expensive.

    Anyway, there is good and bad everywhere, just be certain you take everything into consideration BEFORE you leave the place you love. We had to move for financial reasons and have been blessed to have a beautiful (second house) new home that is paid for. We have no retirement, but a good business right now. I worry about our future, but try to live in the moment. I miss my only child and his family so much and cannot go back but once a year. I think if we could go back 3-4 times a year, I would be OK.

    Just my thoughts on moving. Ca doesn’t have Torchy’s Tacos either!! Boy would I miss the food I enjoy here. Thanks for letting me say my piece.

    • http://movingtotexas.net/ Moving To Texas

      Hey Linda. True, Texas has pros & cons. I agree with you about the heat, it gets tiring after a while. And yes, Torchy’s is addictive. ;)

  • Rebekah

    My husband and I have decided to move to Texas. He retired from the Air Force a year ago and we landed in Sacramento. It was a terrible decision. The job market stinks, schools are mediocre at best, and crime is on the rise. Not to mention the political climate here. I can’t wait to start over in Texas. He is almost done with his accounting degree and is actively seeking work there. Thanks for the article! It definitely reassures me of our decision!